donderdag 29 januari 2015

Radio

Another subject in the Amsterdam Museum was about World War II. A little attic was created with a wooden box.

The box was supposed to be a storage for books. However it had a hidden secret, a radio was placed under in the box. The German occupiers had forbidden to have any radios at home. They were afraid you could hear any informations about their setbacks. Many people had anyway a hidden radio to listen at night to the BBC broadcasts and Radio Oranje (Orange), the dutch government radio in exile in London. Secret messages were passed on about the progresses of the allies. It was very dangerous to have a radio at home because the soldiers often came to search the houses and when a radio was found the owner was arrested, executed or send to one of the notorious camps.

Old Queen Wilhelmina speaking on Radio Oranje from London. In total she spoke a 34 times during the course of the war.

18 opmerkingen:

  1. Interesting, especially in light of the autobiography written by a Nazi resistor during the war years.

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  2. I remember reading an article about "forbidden radios" and what would happen to people found with them. Very interesting post.

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  3. Oh my, think of the brave souls who would defy the rules and keep a radio hidden in the house. We live in such a different age, don't we.

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  4. Hello,

    This is indeed a fascinating snippet of history. The radio did indeed play an important role throughout the war in providing information, misinformation or, in happier times, entertainment. For us, it will always be called the wireless.....it seems so old fashioned these days!

    We have found you via Rosemary and have very much enjoyed our visit. We have been to the Netherlands only once, when we spent most of our time in Rotterdam, and have yet to see Amsterdam. We shall look forward to seeking out some of the treasures you highlight in your posts.

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  5. Thank heavens for these brave souls playing such a key roll.. Wonderful old shot of the Queen Marianne.

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  6. The radios of those days were no easy thing to hide either. We have no idea. Interesting post. Got more?

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  7. The view of the radio box gave me shivers, thinking of all it represents.

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  8. Radio Orange was something that we were told about growing up.

    I'm struck by the steepness of those stairs.

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  9. Dat is wel een heel oud ding.

    Groetjes,
    Filip

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  10. It's hard to realize you had so few freedoms. It wasn't that bad here.

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  11. Another interesting piece of history. People who had these had to be very brave and clever.

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  12. Very clever to hide that radio I remember that picture of Wilhelmina. My mum had a lot of old pictures of the royal family

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  13. Dearest Marianne,
    What a risky thing and yet, people still managed to have their radios...
    Sending you hugs,
    Mariette

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  14. This box is a simple thing that has a fabulous history !

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  15. In agree with the others.Such a scary risk for the brave souls who dared!

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  16. It's the everyday things that really bring home to us the realities of war. Would love to visit Amsterdam & this museum sometime.

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